GREEN REPORT: Wood for Heat -- How Green Is it?

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It’s a burning question.  How practical is it to burn wood for heat.  In the green report, Dave Silverbrand looks at some answers.  And he also introduces us to a young man with a burning desire for success.

Sixteen year-old Jesse and his brothers are stacking wood in his backyard--wood he sells to pay for his school supplies.  He has done sixteen cords this season.    It's Jesse's business, from buying raw logs to cutting and stacking the wood.  Said his father, Louis Altic,  “he does well in school but he doesn't like sitting around that much.  

When he gets tired of studying, he comes outside to cut wood.  And that raises the lingering question a wood for heat.  What effect does it have on the environment?  Supporters of the practice say it is perfect for people on limited income and it stimulates the local economy.  Wood heat creates its share of controversy.  Lots of people say it creates carbons, bad for the atmosphere.  Supporters say in communities like ours, it doesn't make any difference.  Experts say wood burning is not good in smoke-choked cities.  But in rural areas it is fine, and you are helping people like Jesse. 

Said Louis Altic, "Him having to invest the money and then work to make it work is the reason we do it.  He doesn't much care for video games." 

So burning wood is a balancing act.  And we may live in the perfect place for that balance.