Veterans Day Observance held at Adorni Center in Eureka

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EUREKA- Hundreds were in attendance for the 25th annual Rotary Club of Southwest Eureka’s Veterans Day Observance.

The ceremony began with the singing of the national anthem by the Humboldt Harmonaires.  Also, the Eureka High School Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps displayed the nation’s colors.

"We know how important it is to just take a little moment out of veterans day to remember why we celebrate veterans day and to recognize and thank all of the men and women who've served in our armed forces over the years and it's just our way of saying thank you," said John Moore, the Past President of the Rotary Club of Southwest Eureka and the Chairman of the event.

All veterans in attendance were then recognized, one of whom says the community turnout at the event means a lot.

"It's really nice to see people come out.  Because for example, in Vietnam, they were never welcomed home.  They never had a parade.  They were never thanked.  Now they do and that's great and it's good to see that the community is coming out and supporting veterans and their families, it's a good thing," said Kenneth Tinkham, who is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, the Air National Guard and the Army National Guard.

Retired Air Force Colonel Charles DeBellevue was the speaker for the ceremony.  An Air Force veteran of 30 years, DeBellevue shot down more enemy fighters than any other pilot in the Vietnam War.  He spoke about what Veterans Day means to him.

"It's remembering those who've gone before us and for those who are young, the children, getting to know what it took to keep this country free," said DeBellevue.

The ceremony was also a chance for military families to honor their loved ones who are serving in the armed forces.

"I'm just so grateful for those people who put their lives in harm's way, including my son.  Would I want it for him?  No.  I'd rather him stay safe at home, maybe, but we rely on people to answer that call," said Anita Reynolds, whose son is a Captain in the U.S. Army.

The ceremony concluded with a moment of silence for all of the fallen military members and the playing of “Taps.”